Friday, October 27, 2006

The Whole Truth Eating and Recipe Guide

I love the idea of food as fuel, not just dried pods of health-filled goodness, but a wide variety of foods that are meant to be enjoyed in the tasting and beneficial in the eating. I go in phases of actually eating a healthy diet, rich in five to ten servings of vegetables a day, and well, does strawberry ice cream count as fruit? I've been in the second stage for a while now, and I keep trying to motivate myself to get back into that love of all things healthy stage, to no avail.

So, reading about it is the next best thing.

I bought this book after seeing Andrea Beaman on Top Chef last year and loving her positive upbeat and informative style. (Complete aside here--I have been so out of the "TV scene" that I didn't even know that the new season started two weeks ago. I guess it's good since I've been spending my time with family, reading, and blogging instead, and since Bravo reruns them like crazy, I should be able to tape them this weekend, yes on my VCR, and get caught up).

This book is written in a very warm, conversational tone. It is also filled with practical advice for making the most of your food choices. The end of each chapter features a listing of "tasty tidbits," where she highlights the main points or the changes that she's suggesting to you, making it easy to actually act on them. She uses some terms that seem a little out there to me, like hot food and cold foods (and she's not talking about temperature, but the heating and cooling of your body). One chapter is titled "Climate Control" and in it she advocates eating with the seasons, and claims that our bodies crave certain seasonal foods for a reason--such as roasted root vegetables in the fall and cucumbers and tomatoes in the summer.

The second half of the book is filled with recipes. I haven't tried any of them yet, but I probably will.

One thing about this book is that it seems "self-published." The font is sort of a type look. It didn't really bother me, because the quality of the paper and the binding are just fine, but I thought I would add this in case that sort of thing would catch someone unpleasantly by surprise.

In summary, I enjoyed this book. It gave me some motivating information that might help me get out of my poor food choice rut. Other books that have inspired healthy eating for me, that I've enjoyed as much, or more, as this one include The Color Code, and Superfoods Rx.

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This review will be linked to Semicolon's Saturday Review of Books.

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Fall Reading Challenge: five finished, making progress on five others, four still in the wings, one finished and two almost finished that aren't even in the challenge.

7 comments:

Susanne said...

Are you saying that ice cream is not it's own seperate food group that you need to consume each day? I'm crushed! :v(

This sounds like a great book! I'll have to see if the library has it!

Kathleen Marie said...

This is so funny. I recently ordered the Color Code book! Great minds think a like ;)

e-Mom said...

What a concept... a color-coded eating plan. As a designer, I'm really intrigued! I'll have to take a look, thanks.

Jane said...

Great review, wow, you are getting through your fall reading list well.....I am getting through mine but not as quick as I anticipated....I don't know how you do it with kids!!! You have my admiration.

Laurie said...

How right she is. I crave squash and sweet potatoes in the fall and along about April I'd almost give up my inheritance for cucumbers and tomatoes. Sounds like a great book.

Lindsey @ enjoythejourney said...

Everyone's always telling me to "eat the rainbow" and I guess that is what this book is about???

Anonymous said...

My favorite color is green and I love vegetables best. It's all making sense now!! I love the seasonal idea too. Great review!